Listen to what the man said

Day 32: The Shamrock
Waterbury, CT

Criticism is honestly one of the greatest fuels to any art. Constructive criticism allows you, if you’re receptive, to hear other opinions on how to better your work. Negative criticism can add a F.U. attitude and spark to your craft, allowing you to soldier on despite whatever is said to you.
While at the Waterbury show someone who reads my blog lightly scolded me that recently my writing hasn’t been up to par, the major complaint being that the length of the blogs has been very short compared to the bar that I set myself.
I know for a fact that it was meant as a positive bit of criticism, and quite honestly, I couldn’t agree more.
I really don’t consider my ramblings here to be any form of art, but when we’re on the road, visiting cities that we never have been to, the sense of mystery and adventure gives me enough inspiration to paint a literary picture that expands beyond the monotony of the stark reality of what being a touring band is. We wake up, we drive, we load in, we wait to go on, the band plays, we load out, we drive some more, we go to sleep….. Then we wake up and do it all over again. Being immersed in that world though gives me the time and focus to be able to find things within the daily routine to write about. Throw me in New England on the other hand, and all the distractions of non-tour life kill my motivation.
It makes me wonder if songwriters or professional screen writers ever actually listen to (with the intent of growing from) any of the criticism that fans send their way. Obviously, there’s a lot of stupid opinions to filter through, but there is definitely gold to glean from what people are saying about you.
That all being said (and the fact that we’re back in the wild), I’m hoping to get back in to the swing of this thing. (With the exception of the very next post, the one about our few days off and our drive day, haha. That’s bound to be a short one)

Waterbury is Stevie G’s hometown, and his friends and family came out in force. The club is a restaurant with a decent sized stage. The place was packed, with all the tables full and the space between clogged up with standing people.
The band that was headlining had a giant drum rig, so Mochello and I had to find a way to work his kit around their setup, because there was no way to move it.
The guys did their thing so well that the headliner (a cover band) asked the audience to lower their expectations for their set. (In all fairness, while I don’t like cover bands, these guys did a great job!)
After the show, everyone went home, with a four day mid tour break ensuing.